Giving



In 2016, we invested 10% of our proceeds in literacy education and rural development in Morocco.


A
n important part of our mission at Loom & Field is to support women weavers and rural development in Morocco, through our partnership with the Association Tafarnout. Every purchase at Loom & Field directly impacts these communities by generating new jobs for women weavers and contributing to educational programs in remote areas. Morocco and its people have a special place in our hearts because this is where the Loom & Field story began.

 



Literacy Education & Training

In small, isolated villages of the Atlas Mountains, women have limited access to education. To empower these women and help them develop their own revenues from their craft, literacy is a crucial step. Each year, the Association Tafarnout sends teachers to live in the villages for several months at a time, where they teach women weavers how to read, write, and count. These skills are essential for self-sufficiency and create more opportunities as entrepreneurs. 





Education & Youth Outreach

In Morocco, the official language is Arabic, but in the Atlas Mountains, much of the population speaks Berber. When children enter school for the first time at age 5, they often have difficulties integrating because they are taught in Arabic. Proceeds from Loom & Field support a preschool where children from rural villages can learn and practice Arabic in a supportive environment before starting school.





Sustainability Awareness

Today, the majority of Moroccans living in rural villages rely on wood-burning stoves to cook and heat their homes. This contributes to the deforestation of Moroccan forests, increased greenhouse gas emissions, and air pollution. With local artisans, the Association Tafaranout developed a highly efficient and environmentally friendly metal cookstove which greatly reduces the amount of wood required. Our donations provide metal stoves for habitants in mountain villages and schools, helping to reduce deforestation and forest degradation.